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Tuesday, 23 September 2014

Photo Library » Open-Pit

Grade control rig (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This is one of the Reverse Circulation drill rigs used for grade control drilling at KCGM.
Drill 404 working in Stores (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
One of the Production Drill rigs working in the Stores Cutback. This also shows a large amount of tapes indicating a high concentration of old workings in the area.
Aerial View Of Super Pit (Sunday, 1 Jan 2006)
A birds eye view of the massive Super Pit, currently the largest open cut gold mine in Australia.
Super Pit Aerial - Oblique
January 2007 photo from the Southern end of the Super Pit
The start of a blast (Sunday, 1 Jan 2006)
The beginning of a blast at the Super Pit.
Blast pattern & Production rig (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This is a standard blast pattern. The rows of holes are clearly visible . The breaks in the rows, and the red bollards, indicate an old working where the drills are not permitted to enter.
Blasting at the Super Pit (Sunday, 1 Jan 2006)
Blasting at the Super Pit generally occurs 3 -4 times each week.
A blast at the famous Super Pit (Sunday, 1 Jan 2006)
Blasts can generally be viewed from the public lookout providing the shot isn't too close to the look. Blasts are usually wind pending.
A blast at the Super Pit (Sunday, 1 Jan 2006)
Blasts happen 3 - 4 times in the pit.
Mt Charlotte Undergound Crew (Friday, 4 Aug 2006)
The current Mt Charlotte work crew with the ore from the first ROB5 shot fired since 1997.
The New Trucks (Monday, 1 May 2006)
Two of the three brand new 793C mining trucks which bought the total fleet of trucks at the Super Pit to 34.
Remote drill rig & Control Hut (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This is the only sort of drill rig that can enter and drill in areas of old workings. This drill is fully remote controlled so there is not risk to the operator should anything happen to the rig.
ROB5 First Load (Friday, 4 Aug 2006)
The first load extracted from the Reward Orebody (ROB) 5 at Mt Charlotte Underground since 1997.
Trucks Lined Up (Monday, 1 May 2006)
Some of the 793C mining trucks used at the Super Pit.
Trucks Parked Up (Monday, 1 May 2006)
Trucks parked up at PAD 18 for the Wednesday safety BBQ for KCGM Open Pits operators.
Detonator and Primer (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This photos shows a detonator and primer, typical of the sort used at KCGM. The detonator is the small silver tube on the left. The pink cord is the NONEL tube that carries the blast signal to the detonator.
Blasting Material (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This shows the detonator, primer and bulk explosive (also known as product) used in blasting. The detonator has already been inserted into the primer.
New Ausdrill D45KS Rig (Thursday, 1 Mar 2007)
One of the eight DTH (down the hole) drill rigs used at KCGM by Ausdrill for production drilling in the pit. This is a new D45KS rig which are replacing the old IR DM45 rigs.
Loading a Blast hole (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This shows how a blast hole is loaded with explosive. The detonator and primer have already been lowered down the hole, and now the bulk explosive is pumped in.
Stemming (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
Once the explosives have been loaded into the hole, it is plugged with stemming from the stemming loader.
Tetley #2 (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This is another example of the effects of old workings on blasting. This hole opened up when the blast was fired. Some holes may not open up straight away but may stay closed for several hours after the blast.
2 Trucks passing (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
Caterpiller 793 Haul trucks are used to carry the rock from the pit to the crusher or dumps.
Aerial of the Super Pit (Thursday, 9 Jan 2003)
Aerial view of the Superpit taken January 2003.
PC8000 Hydraulic Face Shovel (Thursday, 18 Oct 2001)
This is one of KCGMs Komatsu PC8000 hydraulic face shovels. These are our primary loading machines. The shovel weighs about 650 tonnes and can pick up around 55 tonnes in it's bucket. It can fill a Caterpillar 793 with 4 or 5 buckets and can do this in about 2.5 minutes. KCGM has four of these shovels.
PC8000 Hydraulic Face Shovels (Thursday, 22 Aug 2002)
These are two of our main shovels. They are Komatsu PC8000 hydraulic face shovels. They are loading Caterpillar 793 haul trucks. The trucks carry around 225 tonnes and can be loaded by these shovels in under 4 minutes. The numbers on the back of the shovels makes it easy for the truck drivers (and anyone else) to work out which shovel is which.
Truck 218 being loaded (Tuesday, 27 Aug 2002)
This truck has just backed 'under the shovel' to get loaded. The truckies use their mirrors to see where the shovel is and where they should be. It takes a bit of practice but once you get used to how big your truck is and learn how close you need to park to the shovel it's pretty easy. Some of our trucks are fitted with television cameras to help the new truckies get the feel for backing under shovels and on tipheads.
Caterpillar D10R Dozer (Wednesday, 28 Aug 2002)
This dozer, and three others like it, are responsible for keeping the floors of the pit and dumps level. They do this by using high precision GPS data. Using the GPS satellites, the dozers can keep the floors to within 30 centimeters of design. The dozers are also responsible for making sure there are no sharp rocks sticking out of the ground, or that any rocks that fall off the back of the trucks are removed as quickly as possible. This protects the tyres of the trucks from damage.
Grading the roads (Tuesday, 27 Aug 2002)
This is a Caterpillar 16H grader. KCGM has two of these and their role is to make sure the ramps in and out of the pit are as smooth as possible. They are used for road construction, road maintenance (which is what this one is doing) and also what we call 'sweeping the roads'. When a grader is sweeping the road, it is driving around the ramps looking for any spillage from the back of the trucks. The grader cleans up the spillage as quickly as possible, to reduce the risk of one of the trucks damaging a tyre.
I can see clearly now.... (Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003)
How do the truckies see where they are going at night time? By using the light generated form over 30 of these mobile lighting towers. You can find lighting towers at all intersections and work areas and they generate enough light for everyone to see what they are doing, even on the darkest nights.
Mobile Data Terminal (MDT) in the shovel (Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003)
All of the production machinery is fitted with the Wenco dispatch and monitoring equipment. The display shown in the photo allows the operator to see the current operational status of their machine and receive information from the dispatcher in the control hut.
Dispatch Hut (Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003)
This is the Dispatch Hut. This hut acts as the hub of the Open Pit operation. From here, the dispatcher can see where every bit of equipment is and what they are doing. The computer on the right is the brains of the Wenco dispatch software and it is in constant communication with all of the on-board computers through the radio modems in the cabinet off the right of the screen. The dispatch system is able to direct trucks to where they are needed, but its best feature is that it can record data on all sorts of things, such as payload, cycle times and machine health.
Driving in the pit (Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003)
Driving in the pit can be quite challenging, especially when you are surrounded by these monsters. To get you light vehicle driving permit you have to have about 8 hours of training and practice, and spend several hours as a passenger in one of the trucks.
Cleaning Sticks (Wednesday, 1 Jan 2003)
Because we are mining through a large number of old underground workings, we come across many timbers, rails and other material that was used by the old miners. Much of this material is in our ore zones and can cause problems with processing, so we have to remove it from the ore before treatment. The only ecomonic way we have found to do this is by hand. We use a Caterpillar 992 loader to pick up a bucket of this 'dirty' material, then drag it across the ground. Once it has done this, a team of 'stick pickers' move over the material and remove any rubbish.
Pulling Batters (Sunday, 27 Jul 2003)
One of the important jobs in the Super Pit is ensuring that the walls of the pit are safe. One way we do this is by 'pulling the batters'. We use an excavator like this one to go along the walls behind the shovel and pull off any loose material that may have been left on the walls. In oxide near the surface this involves shaping the wall until it is at a certain angle (eg 55 degrees). In sulphide where the walls are much harder, it is generally a case of just removing any loose material that might come down later on.
Dust control on a blast (Sunday, 27 Jul 2003)
KCGM is very committed to minimising the effects of mining on the community. One of the ways we do this is by minimising the amount of dust the operation generates. A primary source of dust is at the face, where the shovel and trucks are constantly disturbing broken material and have the potential to create dust. We use water carts like this one to constantly water down the faces and floors around the work areas. This keeps the dust down, reducing the impact on the community and also providing a safer working environment for the operators.
Mining Process Bench Plan (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This disgram shows a typical bench design. A bench is composed of a series of blasts. Blasts are designed with the location of ore and old workings in mind, as well as various mining requirements.
Maintaining the waste dumps with wheel dozers (Sunday, 14 Aug 2005)
Dump maintenance is a very important part of mining. It is necessary to ensure that the tip-head windrows are kept at the correct height and that the floors are kept level and smooth for the trucks to drive on. Machines like this Caterpillar 854 wheel dozer are used to ensure the dumps are kept safe and usable.
Loading a hole with explosives (Sunday, 14 Aug 2005)
The bulk explosives are loaded into the blast holes using trucks like this. The pink material coming out of the auger is the explosive and it is going down a blast hole behind the blast crew member. This truck is called a Bulkmaster.
Mt Charlotte Bogger (Tuesday, 25 Oct 2005)
One of Mt Charlotte’s loaders, otherwise known as a Bogger.
Glory Hole (Tuesday, 25 Oct 2005)
The Glory Hole being filled from one of three conveyor belts.
Oroya 290 hole in R&W (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
Areas of known or suspected old workings are flagged off to protect personnel and equipment. This photo shows an old shaft that has opened up in the floor of the pit.
MT Truck (Tuesday, 25 Oct 2005)
One of the MT trucks in the Mt Charlotte Fleet. These trucks have a capacity of carrying 50 tonnes
Old Working in Bench (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This was one of the old stopes that we have come across. The machine in the background is a PC8000 hydraulic shovel and the truck is a CAT 793C. This was part of the old Tetley lode workings.
Longreach Drill Rig (Thursday, 19 Sep 2002)
This is one of the specialised drill rigs used at KCGM to probe the old workings in an effort to determine their exact size and location.
Aerial
Looking from the southern end of the pit
A 793C haul truck
Carrying 225 tonnes of material, only one in every 6 trucks carries gold. This gold, once processed, is the size of a golf ball, which is about 16 ounces.
793C Haul Truck
Two of the 33 793C trucks pass on the massive haul roads at the Super Pit. Each truck stands 6 meters high (with tray down) and is 9 meters long.
Getting into a 793C Haul Truck
Truck Drivers need to climb stairs to get to their cabin, which seats two. The side seat is known to the crew as the 'dicky seat'. This seat is used for training, when either the student or teacher is required to watch.
The Workshop
The machinery undergo regular scheduled maintenance to avoid large periods of down time. The sheds are required to be massive, with a tipped truck reaching heights of 10 meters. In this photo, you can get a perspective of the shear size of these trucks.
This is one of the Reverse Circulation drill rigs used for grade control drilling at KCGM.
One of the Production Drill rigs working in the Stores Cutback. This also shows a large amount of tapes indicating a high concentration of old workings in the area.
A birds eye view of the massive Super Pit, currently the largest open cut gold mine in Australia.
January 2007 photo from the Southern end of the Super Pit
The beginning of a blast at the Super Pit.
This is a standard blast pattern. The rows of holes are clearly visible . The breaks in the rows, and the red bollards, indicate an old working where the drills are not permitted to enter.
Blasting at the Super Pit generally occurs 3 -4 times each week.
Blasts can generally be viewed from the public lookout providing the shot isn't too close to the look. Blasts are usually wind pending.
Blasts happen 3 - 4 times in the pit.
The current Mt Charlotte work crew with the ore from the first ROB5 shot fired since 1997.
Two of the three brand new 793C mining trucks which bought the total fleet of trucks at the Super Pit to 34.
This is the only sort of drill rig that can enter and drill in areas of old workings. This drill is fully remote controlled so there is not risk to the operator should anything happen to the rig.
The first load extracted from the Reward Orebody (ROB) 5 at Mt Charlotte Underground since 1997.
Some of the 793C mining trucks used at the Super Pit.
Trucks parked up at PAD 18 for the Wednesday safety BBQ for KCGM Open Pits operators.
This photos shows a detonator and primer, typical of the sort used at KCGM. The detonator is the small silver tube on the left. The pink cord is the NONEL tube that carries the blast signal to the detonator.
This shows the detonator, primer and bulk explosive (also known as product) used in blasting. The detonator has already been inserted into the primer.
One of the eight DTH (down the hole) drill rigs used at KCGM by Ausdrill for production drilling in the pit. This is a new D45KS rig which are replacing the old IR DM45 rigs.
This shows how a blast hole is loaded with explosive. The detonator and primer have already been lowered down the hole, and now the bulk explosive is pumped in.
Once the explosives have been loaded into the hole, it is plugged with stemming from the stemming loader.
This is another example of the effects of old workings on blasting. This hole opened up when the blast was fired. Some holes may not open up straight away but may stay closed for several hours after the blast.
Caterpiller 793 Haul trucks are used to carry the rock from the pit to the crusher or dumps.
Aerial view of the Superpit taken January 2003.
This is one of KCGMs Komatsu PC8000 hydraulic face shovels. These are our primary loading machines. The shovel weighs about 650 tonnes and can pick up around 55 tonnes in it's bucket. It can fill a Caterpillar 793 with 4 or 5 buckets and can do this in about 2.5 minutes. KCGM has four of these shovels.
These are two of our main shovels. They are Komatsu PC8000 hydraulic face shovels. They are loading Caterpillar 793 haul trucks. The trucks carry around 225 tonnes and can be loaded by these shovels in under 4 minutes. The numbers on the back of the shovels makes it easy for the truck drivers (and anyone else) to work out which shovel is which.
This truck has just backed 'under the shovel' to get loaded. The truckies use their mirrors to see where the shovel is and where they should be. It takes a bit of practice but once you get used to how big your truck is and learn how close you need to park to the shovel it's pretty easy. Some of our trucks are fitted with television cameras to help the new truckies get the feel for backing under shovels and on tipheads.
This dozer, and three others like it, are responsible for keeping the floors of the pit and dumps level. They do this by using high precision GPS data. Using the GPS satellites, the dozers can keep the floors to within 30 centimeters of design. The dozers are also responsible for making sure there are no sharp rocks sticking out of the ground, or that any rocks that fall off the back of the trucks are removed as quickly as possible. This protects the tyres of the trucks from damage.
This is a Caterpillar 16H grader. KCGM has two of these and their role is to make sure the ramps in and out of the pit are as smooth as possible. They are used for road construction, road maintenance (which is what this one is doing) and also what we call 'sweeping the roads'. When a grader is sweeping the road, it is driving around the ramps looking for any spillage from the back of the trucks. The grader cleans up the spillage as quickly as possible, to reduce the risk of one of the trucks damaging a tyre.
How do the truckies see where they are going at night time? By using the light generated form over 30 of these mobile lighting towers. You can find lighting towers at all intersections and work areas and they generate enough light for everyone to see what they are doing, even on the darkest nights.
All of the production machinery is fitted with the Wenco dispatch and monitoring equipment. The display shown in the photo allows the operator to see the current operational status of their machine and receive information from the dispatcher in the control hut.
This is the Dispatch Hut. This hut acts as the hub of the Open Pit operation. From here, the dispatcher can see where every bit of equipment is and what they are doing. The computer on the right is the brains of the Wenco dispatch software and it is in constant communication with all of the on-board computers through the radio modems in the cabinet off the right of the screen. The dispatch system is able to direct trucks to where they are needed, but its best feature is that it can record data on all sorts of things, such as payload, cycle times and machine health.
Driving in the pit can be quite challenging, especially when you are surrounded by these monsters. To get you light vehicle driving permit you have to have about 8 hours of training and practice, and spend several hours as a passenger in one of the trucks.
Because we are mining through a large number of old underground workings, we come across many timbers, rails and other material that was used by the old miners. Much of this material is in our ore zones and can cause problems with processing, so we have to remove it from the ore before treatment. The only ecomonic way we have found to do this is by hand. We use a Caterpillar 992 loader to pick up a bucket of this 'dirty' material, then drag it across the ground. Once it has done this, a team of 'stick pickers' move over the material and remove any rubbish.
One of the important jobs in the Super Pit is ensuring that the walls of the pit are safe. One way we do this is by 'pulling the batters'. We use an excavator like this one to go along the walls behind the shovel and pull off any loose material that may have been left on the walls. In oxide near the surface this involves shaping the wall until it is at a certain angle (eg 55 degrees). In sulphide where the walls are much harder, it is generally a case of just removing any loose material that might come down later on.
KCGM is very committed to minimising the effects of mining on the community. One of the ways we do this is by minimising the amount of dust the operation generates. A primary source of dust is at the face, where the shovel and trucks are constantly disturbing broken material and have the potential to create dust. We use water carts like this one to constantly water down the faces and floors around the work areas. This keeps the dust down, reducing the impact on the community and also providing a safer working environment for the operators.
This disgram shows a typical bench design. A bench is composed of a series of blasts. Blasts are designed with the location of ore and old workings in mind, as well as various mining requirements.
Dump maintenance is a very important part of mining. It is necessary to ensure that the tip-head windrows are kept at the correct height and that the floors are kept level and smooth for the trucks to drive on. Machines like this Caterpillar 854 wheel dozer are used to ensure the dumps are kept safe and usable.
The bulk explosives are loaded into the blast holes using trucks like this. The pink material coming out of the auger is the explosive and it is going down a blast hole behind the blast crew member. This truck is called a Bulkmaster.
One of Mt Charlotte’s loaders, otherwise known as a Bogger.
The Glory Hole being filled from one of three conveyor belts.
Areas of known or suspected old workings are flagged off to protect personnel and equipment. This photo shows an old shaft that has opened up in the floor of the pit.
One of the MT trucks in the Mt Charlotte Fleet. These trucks have a capacity of carrying 50 tonnes
This was one of the old stopes that we have come across. The machine in the background is a PC8000 hydraulic shovel and the truck is a CAT 793C. This was part of the old Tetley lode workings.
This is one of the specialised drill rigs used at KCGM to probe the old workings in an effort to determine their exact size and location.
Looking from the southern end of the pit
Carrying 225 tonnes of material, only one in every 6 trucks carries gold. This gold, once processed, is the size of a golf ball, which is about 16 ounces.
Two of the 33 793C trucks pass on the massive haul roads at the Super Pit. Each truck stands 6 meters high (with tray down) and is 9 meters long.
Truck Drivers need to climb stairs to get to their cabin, which seats two. The side seat is known to the crew as the 'dicky seat'. This seat is used for training, when either the student or teacher is required to watch.
The machinery undergo regular scheduled maintenance to avoid large periods of down time. The sheds are required to be massive, with a tipped truck reaching heights of 10 meters. In this photo, you can get a perspective of the shear size of these trucks.

 
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